Trip Report: Kabini River Lodge/Nagarahole NP

Trip:       Kabini River Lodge/Nagarahole NP

Camp:   JLR’s Kabini River Lodge

Dates:   20-22 Sep ‘14

Who:     GiK & SV

GiK and I had met SV and his family at K Gudi last, and we hit it off well considering our shared interests in wildlife. We had proposed a trip to Kabini together and SV promptly did the reservations as soon as he got back to Bangalore. By happy coincidence, BR who figures in my last K. Gudi post was also there, and it was a reunion of sorts. We did two nights at Kabini River Lodge, and GiK and I stayed back for an extra evening safari on day three, leaving for Bangalore late in the evening. This was a good plan as in addition to the extra safari, it allowed us to avoid return traffic on the Mysore road.

Kabini RL is considered JLR’s flagship property and their sightings are reputed to be second to none. Despite this I haven’t been there after a single trip ten years back. The scale of the establishment puts me off I guess. The safaris are indubitably spectacular, but the place lacks the sense of intimacy that the K. Gudi camp has, in my opinion. And BR agrees with me on this.

The “five kilometer” road. This is a disused and restricted (erstwhile) section of the highway to Kerala – SH17D. This road was fairly productive for us. Particularly interesting was a spot along this road known as the “burning place”, which bears the scars of the 2012 fire that ravaged the park.  Kabini Sep 2014 1080

Changeable hawk eagle. We saw at least three CHEs and only one Crested Serpent Eagle in a reversal of the usual proportions.

Kabini Sep 2014 868

Sambar hind. Note the bald patch on the neck, which is a strange and not-fully-understood occurrence in the species. Kabini Sep 2014 885

I was trying to get a shot of these two stags sparring, but they took a break to stare back at us instead. Kabini Sep 2014 227

I saw Common langur without the tuft after a long while. The langurs that occur in Bandipur, K. Gudi and Galibore are all Tufted langurs, with a distinct tuft on their heads. Langurs helped us locate a she-leopard with a single cub that we sighted on two safaris, near the KV waterhole. Incidentally, there is a watch tower by this waterhole on which I’d spent an entire afternoon ten years back, with only  chital and langur sightings to show for all my trouble. Kabini Sep 2014 851

Both gaur and wild boar were strangely missing. We saw just two herds of gaur, and that in the last couple of safaris. And just one token wild boar. This animal below was photographed in the “burning place” Kabini Sep 2014 1076

We saw plenty of elephants right through the trip. This makhna crossed the road just behind our jeep. Kabini Sep 2014 003

We met this young tusker while he was grazing by the highway. Kabini Sep 2014 085

We watched a herd of three elephants systematically destroy a patch of teak saplings. Kabini Sep 2014 888

Elephants stand around all day and even sleep standing up. This cow gave her leg a break. Kabini Sep 2014 891

Another member of the herd of three approaching. Kabini Sep 2014 893 Kabini Sep 2014 925

This cow approached very close to the jeep. And stood placidly grazing at spitting distance. I asked the naturalist Ravi if Nagarahole elephants were so habituated to human presence that they grazed like cattle around us. He replied that they do mock-charge frequently, and that the tolerance we were seeing wasn’t always present. Kabini Sep 2014 940

We sighted this large tusker with a broken tusk on two separate occasions, both on the “five kilometer” road. Kabini Sep 2014 953

Another massive tusker, this one in the “burning place”. Kabini Sep 2014 1167

This tusker accompanied a small herd. Kabini Sep 2014 1170

A pair of Golden  jackals (Canis aureus) came cantering down the track, stepped off it to pass the jeep, and regained the track to continue on their way. Typical jackal behavior. Kabini Sep 2014 121 Kabini Sep 2014 142

We encountered a pack of three dhole on the “five kilometer” road. Possibly the same pack was sighted by another group the next day in the “burning place”. Kabini Sep 2014 994

We had leopard sightings in three of the five safaris. This she-leopard was found on a tree by the highway, a little before the Balle gate. She stayed put for forty five minutes and treated us to a variety of poses. Two cubs were with her, and had descended out of sight before we arrived at the spot. Kabini Sep 2014 378 Kabini Sep 2014 590 Kabini Sep 2014 608 Kabini Sep 2014 709

The cat was briefly distracted by something in the tree above. We later learned that there was a Giant flying squirrel (Petaurista petaurista) on the tree, but none of us noticed at the time. Kabini Sep 2014 669  

My jungle trees 101 progressed at a slow crawl. I learned to ID the Nandi tree or Crepe myrtle (Lagerstroemia microcarpa). This tree is called the naked lady of the forest alluding to how it looks when shorn of its bark – the trunk resembles that of the Eucalyptus, somewhat. And the Belleric myrobalan (Terminalia bellerica). Both of which were fairly common. I also learned that the Axlewood tree has a handle too – leper of the forest – owing to its pale blotchy patterns. There were plenty of these trees in Nagarahole. My old friends Tectona grandis, Terminalia tomentosa and Phyllanthus emblica were there in force too.

The birding lacked the usual intensity. What came our way was what we saw. There was plenty of unrecognized birdlife we zipped past in our quest for megafauna. Incidentally, Grey wagtails had just started to arrive for the winter and were seen around the Gol Ghar. But what was truly striking was the sheer number of Grey junglefowl everywhere. On two occasions, I counted eight individuals foraging at one place.

The list

Birds:

  1. Ashy prinia
  2. Ashy wood-swallow
  3. Asian brown flycatcher
  4. Asian paradise flycatcher
  5. Black-hooded oriole
  6. Bronzed drongo
  7. Brown fish owl
  8. Bushlark?
  9. Changeable hawk eagle
  10. Common hawk cuckoo (calls)
  11. Coppersmith barbet (calls)
  12. Crested serpent eagle
  13. Unidentified flameback
  14. Green imperial pigeon
  15. Grey francolin
  16. Grey junglefowl
  17. Grey wagtail
  18. Hill myna
  19. Hoopoe (calls)
  20. Indian grey hornbill
  21. Jungle myna
  22. Jungle owlet
  23. Magpie robin
  24. Malabar parakeet
  25. Paddyfield pipit
  26. Peafowl
  27. Pied bushchat
  28. Plum-headed parakeet
  29. Puff-throated babbler (calls)
  30. Brown-capped pygmy woodpecker
  31. Racket-tailed drongo
  32. Red-whiskered bulbul
  33. Red-vented bulbul
  34. Rose-ringed parakeet
  35. Streak-throated woodpecker
  36. Tailor bird
  37. Velvet-fronted nuthatch
  38. Vernal hanging parrot
  39. White-bellied drongo
  40. White-bellied woodpecker
  41. White-cheeked barbet (calls)
  42. White-throated kingfisher

Mammals:

  1. Barking deer
  2. Chital
  3. Common langur
  4. Dhole
  5. Elephant
  6. Golden jackal
  7. Indian flying fox
  8. Leopard
  9. Malabar giant squirrel
  10. Ruddy mongoose
  11. Sambar
  12. Stripe-necked mongoose
  13. Wild boar
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5 thoughts on “Trip Report: Kabini River Lodge/Nagarahole NP

  1. vagabonder says:

    I had done a trip to Kabini in the first week of August and was assured by everyone there that it was the worst time to visit because of the heavy monsoon. But loved just being in lush green vegetation and didn’t mind the fact that I spotted very few big mammals (a pair of Golden Jackals being the highlight) You seem to have seen a lot more!

    • Badri says:

      What we caught was unexceptional by Kabini standards is the impression I got, for this season naturally. May also depend on how many safaris, right? We did five jeep safaris. If you check the sightings log on JLRexplore.com, it gives you an idea of how productive the place is.

      • vagabonder says:

        Yeah, I did 4 jeep safaris and one boat safari. Whichever safari I went on was just bang on unlucky, though I was very happy just being in the jungle and seeing the few birds and animals I did see in relative solitude. Afzal was the naturalist on all my trips and I liked that he stopped for birds and sometimes, even blister beetles. Only 2-3 jeeps went into the jungle when I was there and everyone else came away with tigers, leopards, dholes, mongoose etc. I suppose my highlight was the chestnut-headed kingfisher, which I had never seen before.

        But yes, should maybe go back in Feb/March for the more “epic” sightings. Would also be terribly crowded then.

    • Badri says:

      Btw, I don’t believe I saw your blog post on that Aug trip?

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