Animal tracks @ Galibore

The mud road that runs past the Galibore Nature Camp is a fascinating stretch to study animal tracks. A lot of wildlife traffic passes on this road each night, and the next morning can be very well-spent trying to read them.

Animal tracks are seldom as clearly defined as the drawings or photographs we see in guides. A smooth surface of fine-grained sand is required to capture that sort of print, and that kind of surface is rarely found outside of a Pug Impression Pad (PIP). The sand is often coarse, the ground hard, and prints superimposed upon each other. Cattle or deer prints can make a mess of the surface too. Reading animal tracks therefore takes skill that comes with practice. Thomraj is a pastmaster at just that. He takes in all the details at a glance and can see patterns that are tough for us to decipher even when pointed out. He can often reconstruct what occurred hours earlier from poorly captured prints – a leopard leaping off the track, a Black-naped hare rolling on its back and so on.

All the tracks featured here were visible in the course of each outing.

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Grey junglefowl

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Grey wagtail

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Peacock

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Red spurfowl

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Snake

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Cattle

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Buffalo. Larger than cattle tracks. The split hoofmarks run in parallel unlike the cattle tracks which are pointed at the forward end.

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Chital. Heart-shaped.

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Sambar. Larger than chital prints.

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Pig. Unlike the chital’s pointed ends, the pig’s two halves run roughly in parallel.

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Langur

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Porcupine drag marks. More easily captured than paw prints.

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Porcupine. The heel pad shows two distinct sections, which is a key diagnostic.

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Mice leave a profusion of tiny tracks.

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Bull elephant. Fore and hind feet. The circular print to the right is of the hind foot.

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Jackal

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Jungle cat

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Sloth bear. Forepaw to the left.

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Leopard. There were three sets of tracks, two proceeding in one direction and the third in the opposite direction.

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Pellets of the Four-horned antelope. The animal has the habit of returning to the same spot to drop pellets, making it vulnerable to poachers.

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The sloth bear’s scat shows a grainy texture.

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Antlion’s pit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Trip Report: Galibore, Nov ’16

Trip Report:        Galibore Nature Camp

Dates:                   31 Oct – 1 Nov 2016

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Grizzled giant squirrel foraging on Ivy gourd/Tindora/Thondekai (Coccinia grandis) vine

I did this trip alone. It was a follow-up to my last trip. Walking along the road then, the sheer number of species that had left their tracks in the sand overnight had planted this idea in my head. I had then wanted to come back to list and photograph the tracks seen on any typical day here. Thomraj is a walking encyclopedia on junglecraft and he was equally keen on this idea. I’m publishing that list and those pictures in a separate post.

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Short-nosed fruit bats in the camp

I had left Bangalore very early in the morning, at 3:30 AM, intending to reach the camp by 6 AM. There are a large number of cattle that walk along that track during the day and anyone intending to study wildlife spoor has to make an early start before the tracks are all messed up. Reaching by 6 AM would give me two mornings instead of one. That and the notion of encountering wildlife at the break of dawn on the drive to the camp. I was extremely hopeful of elephant, leopard or sloth bear sighting, but nothing was stirring (except for a couple of herds of chital) and I reached the camp with nothing to show for my trouble. There too, Thomraj was tied up guiding another guest and as my check-in time was hours away, I couldn’t make undue demands of his time. I was therefore constrained to hang around camp, which was not altogether a bad thing. The Sida patch kept me busy with the butterflies, and the pair of White-rumped shama that frequent the camp was bold enough to perch very close if I stood still.

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Juvenile male Indian paradise flycatcher. This individual provided us with some minutes of close-up entertainment as it hawked vigorously beneath the promontory.

The species mix in the Sida patch was different from that on my last trip three weeks back. Common crows were all over the place this time. There was also Common rose, Crimson rose, Tawny coster, Plain and striped tiger, Common sailer, Blue and Dark blue tiger, Common grass yellow, Common jezebel and plenty of Psyche.

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Crimson rose

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Dark blue tiger

 

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Common crow in flight

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Striped tiger

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Common rose

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Common sailer

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Plain tiger

I had wanted to sight a Four-horned antelope for a while now. Thomraj suggested we climb up the hill in the late afternoon and settle down on the summit for a couple of hours. He thought that if we stayed still and silent, we would probably catch sight of one. The new manager  – Abhijit – was also keen on this idea and the three of us set off at half past three. The weather was uncomfortably hot and the climb was a stiff one. We made it to the top of the hill without too much difficulty, but Thomraj’s plan was to ascend yet another hill beyond this one.  We had just started ascending from the watchtower when we caught sight of our quarry – a lone doe that briefly stared at us before bounding up the hillside in alarm. Mission accomplished but we continued anyway to see what else we could get.

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Four-horned antelope doe

The second stretch was steep and very taxing, but we eventually arrived at the top, drenched in sweat, panting desperately and tanned three shades darker. There is a large, flat rock there, with a spectacular 180 degree view of the valley beyond. The plan was to sit at this vantage point for as long as the light permitted, while scouting for signs of movement across the vast area in sight. Sure enough, a sloth bear was presently seen on the far hillside, foraging. Thomraj said there was a second one, but Abhijit and I could spot just the one.

Langurs called in alarm persistently from beyond an intervening ridge and a lone sambar deer also belled a few times. The persistence of the calls convinced us that a leopard was afoot, and we had high hopes of catching sight of it. The leopard didn’t show itself for the next hour however though the calls continued, and as the light was fading, we had to reluctantly abandon our position to return to camp. On the way down, we spotted another slot bear, this one much closer and moving along a line that seemingly converged with our own. The bear descended into a rocky depression shortly thereafter however and wasn’t seen again.

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The stiff climb induced a very painful bout of cramps in my legs as we were relaxing in the camp later that evening.

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Monitor lizard in the camp

We hardly paid any attention to birds this time, but here’s the list for what it’s worth.

  1. Alexandrine parakeet
  2. Asian paradise flycatcher
  3. Black-hooded oriole
  4. Blue-faced malkoha
  5. Brahminy kite
  6. Brown hawk owl
  7. Brown-headed barbet
  8. Changeable hawk eagle
  9. Common iora
  10. Common skylark (calls)
  11. Common tailorbird (calls)
  12. Common woodshrike (calls)
  13. Darter
  14. European bee-eater
  15. Golden-fronted leaf bird
  16. Green bee-eater
  17. Greenish warbler
  18. Green imperial pigeon
  19. Indian robin
  20. Jungle bush quail (calls)
  21. Jungle owlet
  22. Lesser fish eagle (calls)
  23. Lesser flameback
  24. Little cormorant
  25. Magpie robin
  26. Purple-rumped sunbird
  27. Red-rumped swallow
  28. Red spurfowl
  29. Red-wattled lapwing (calls)
  30. Red-whiskered bulbul
  31. Rose-ringed parakeet
  32. Spotted dove
  33. Stork-billed kingfisher (calls)
  34. Tawny-bellied babbler
  35. Tickell’s blue flycatcher
  36. White-bellied drongo
  37. White-browed bulbul (calls)
  38. White-browed wagtail
  39. White-cheeked barbet (calls)
  40. White-rumped shama
  41. White-throated kingfisher
  42. Yellow-billed babbler

 

  1. Bonnet macaque
  2. Chital
  3. Four-horned antelope
  4. Grizzled giant squirrel
  5. Monitor lizard
  6. Tufted langur
  7. Sambar (alarm calls)
  8. Sloth bear

Trip report: Galibore, Oct ’16

Trip Report:        Galibore Nature Camp

Dates:                   10-11 Oct 2016

Who:                     P and H

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A single night at Galibore planned on impulse. And an interesting trip it turned out to be.

My good friend and ace birding guide Thomraj had been convalescing after a kidney stone procedure and returned by forenoon the same morning I reached. Meanwhile Govind and I took a walk down the road eastwards after paying our customary respects to the resident Brown hawk owl. Greenish warblers called from virtually every tree – thousands of them must have migrated into our southern forests at this time as they were all over the place here, in Yercaud, and doubtless elsewhere too. The weather was cool in the shade but mildly uncomfortable in the sun. We found a quiet spot by the river to sit in. A Sirkeer malkoha flew past rousing us and we tailed it to where it settled. On the way back, we spent a while watching a White-rumped shama which posed for us, while a flock of Tawny-bellied babblers foraged in the thickets around it. Govind meanwhile delivered a little lesson on the nuances of chital pellets. The stags evidently drop elongated ones while the does’ tend towards the spherical. We spent some time picking pellets off the forest floor to assess them.

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Lesser fish eagle

One of the most special things to do in Galibore is the walk back from the coracle alighting point at sunset. The walk through the forest in the fading light for a few kilometers offers potential for interesting encounters. A few days back, Thomraj, Govind and another staff member heard langurs calling, waited and were rewarded with a leopard sighting. Thomraj also related another recent story about a tusker that entered the water on the opposite bank on sighting them and swam across at alarming speed, causing them to abandon the coracles and scramble for the jeep. However on this day, all we did was to pause awhile to admire a brace of Painted spurfowl and a twittering Brown-capped pygmy woodpecker.

There are always interesting elephant stories to catch up on in each visit. Like the one about a lone elephant that approached the kitchen building one night not long back. Or the one about how Thomraj ran into a herd while on his motorbike, in the forenoon a few days back. He had to flee back to the camp and have a jeep escort his bike through the herd.

I had intended to sit on the promontory late into the night listening, but a crew was working on fixing a faulty water pump by the river accompanied by great noise and light. I went to bed after waiting in vain for them to finish, around midnight. Alarm calls erupted at 2 AM, but I was too sleepy to step out. Two animals were calling; one was a sambar. I had forgotten that sambar occurred here, but Thomraj confirmed this the next morning. The other was a call I struggled to place – Thomraj hadn’t noticed the calls themselves, but surmised (the next morning) that chital sometimes call with a hoarser version and that was probably what I’d heard. Incidentally, we also heard a four-horned antelope repeatedly calling in alarm during the evening coracle ride – first time I’ve heard one.

With some guidance from my pal VV, I’ve been doing some homework on butterflies over the past few days and found occasion to test my rank beginner skills in the green patch between the promontory and the river that attracts large numbers of butterflies. Commonly seen species were White orange-tip, Common wanderer, Common mormon, Common grass yellow, Yellow orange-tip and Tawny coster. There was also what I thought was the Indian skipper, but checking the coloration subsequently revealed that it was something else. Also identified, probably correctly, Plain tiger and Common jezebel elsewhere.

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Tawny coster

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Skipper sp.

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Yellow orange-tip

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White orange-tip

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Wrongly ID’d as Common wanderer. VV pointed out that this is probably a Common gull.

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This is the plant that attracts butterflies in numbers. Karthik (www.wildwanderer.com) subsequently helped ID it as Sida sp.

On day 2, just before we departed the camp, a juvenile Grizzled giant squirrel lost its grip and came crashing down from the canopy. It sat stunned for a while but otherwise seemed none the worse for its fall, and was soon racing back up the bole.

Three special sightings this time. Post lunch, a pack of four dhole trotted westwards on the opposite bank, walking in single file close to the water’s edge. They paused to stare at the camp and then continued their way upstream.

At sunset, the new manager Abhijit and I were chatting while I was idly gazing at a black object on the opposite bank. It took a while for the lights to come on, but I eventually realized that the object was a foraging sloth bear. As it often happens, the bear wandered out of sight shortly after this realization struck.

On the second morning, Thomraj and I walked westwards on the road towards the Hyra camp (which is what I remember it’s called) a couple of kilometers away. We were treading on fresh elephant spoor; a bull elephant that Thomraj figured was a known single tusker had passed not long back. Thomraj was on high alert, scanning the jungle ahead with utmost care while simultaneously trying to find birds. The spoor veered off into the jungle a short way before the FD shack at Hyra and we turned back shortly after that.

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Bull elephant spoor. Fore and hind feet. The larger print to the right is of the hind foot.

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Sloth bear pugmarks. Fore and hind feet. Print on the right is of the hind foot.

On the way back, we had a superb Southern tree shrew sighting. First time I’ve seen one in the Cauvery WLS. Thomraj also showed me a small, partially buried stone a short way off the track which purportedly shows ancient etchings in Tamil-like script.

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Unidentified lizard in the forest

  1. Alexandrine parakeet (calls)
  2. Asian paradise flycatcher (calls)
  3. Black-hooded oriole (calls)
  4. Blue-faced malkoha
  5. Brahminy kite
  6. Brown-capped pigmy woodpecker
  7. Brown hawk owl
  8. Common iora
  9. Common kingfisher
  10. Common myna
  11. Common skylark
  12. Common tailorbird
  13. Common woodshrike
  14. Darter
  15. Golden-fronted leaf bird
  16. Great cormorant
  17. Green bee eater
  18. Greenish warbler
  19. Grey junglefowl
  20. Green imperial pigeon
  21. Hoopoe
  22. Indian grey hornbill
  23. Indian robin
  24. Jungle babbler
  25. Jungle crow
  26. Jungle owlet (calls)
  27. Lesser fish eagle
  28. Lesser flameback
  29. Little cormorant
  30. Egret (unidentified)
  31. Magpie robin
  32. Painted spurfowl
  33. Peafowl
  34. Pied kingfisher
  35. Purple-rumped sunbird
  36. Red-rumped swallow
  37. Red-vented bulbul
  38. Red-wattled lapwing
  39. Red-whiskered bulbul
  40. Rose-ringed parakeet
  41. Sirkeer malkoha
  42. Spotted dove
  43. Stork-billed kingfisher (calls)
  44. Tawny-bellied babbler
  45. Tickell’s blue flycatcher
  46. White-bellied drongo
  47. White-browed bulbul (calls)
  48. White-browed wagtail
  49. White-cheeked barbet (calls)
  50. White-rumped shama
  51. White-throated kingfisher
  52. Wire-tailed swallow
  53. Yellow-billed babbler
  54. Yellow-crowned woodpecker
  1. Bonnet macaque
  2. Chital
  3. Dhole
  4. Four-horned antelope (alarm calls)
  5. Grizzled giant squirrel
  6. Tufted langur
  7. Mugger
  8. Sambar (alarm calls)
  9. Sloth bear
  10. Southern tree shrew

Trip Report: Galibore Nature Camp

Dates:                   12-13 Dec 2015

Who:                     SB and a couple of colleagues

All the images used in this post were clicked by S. Balajee.

BIL B wanted to take a couple of colleagues on a short birding trip and invited me along. His colleagues R and R could only manage a day trip while the two of us stayed back for the night, leaving after breakfast the next morning.

The weather was surprisingly warm and muggy for this time of year, with the sun blazing through the day and some marginal coolness creeping in well after dark. There was little cloud cover.

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Common kingfisher (S. Balajee)

Thomraj was in his elements, ferreting out sightings with his impossibly precise visual acuity. After paying our respects to pairs of Brown hawk owl and Indian scops owl in the camp, we started on our outings which for most part comprised floating down the river on a coracle and then trudging back on foot.

For some reason, White-browed bulbul were ubiquitous and noisy this time around. Other frequently heard calls were of Tailorbird, oriole (I usually associate the short, ascending crrrrk with the Black-hooded oriole, but we did spot a Golden oriole calling this way too), Purple-rumped sunbird, Asian brown flycatcher and White-browed wagtail (on the water). Stork-billed kingfisher called occasionally as did Spotted dove, Green imperial pigeon, Jungle babbler, Green bee eater and Golden-fronted leaf bird.

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Yellow-throated sparrow (S. Balajee)

We had uncommon luck with raptors. Walking back to the camp from the Muthathi side, we first flushed a Crested serpent eagle that flapped away on great wings. We were trying to trace its position when a Black eagle emerged from pretty much the same direction, and settled on a tree a considerable distance away. We got off the path for a closer look and resuming the track, we were surprised by yet another raptor, which we identified back at the camp as the Tawny eagle. This worthy made a reappearance later in the day while we were on the river. BIL wanted a shot of a Lesser fish eagle and we found an exceptionally obliging individual on the day 2 outing.

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Lesser fish eagle (S. Balajee)

For the first time, we were compelled to beach the coracle and hop off twice midway – once to tail a pair of Brown fish owls, which were being baited by a pair of crows, as they shifted one perch to another; and again to confirm a shikra’s ID. While we were after the owls, a sloth bear was spotted across the river from our position by a couple of staff members lounging on the bank a hundred meters downstream. We had heard chital calling from across and had discussed the possibility of a leopard being afoot.

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Small pratincole (S. Balajee)

While on this topic, incidentally, I asked Thomraj why chital alarm calls were heard virtually every half hour on some visits, and never heard at all on others. Thomraj’s explanation was that chital were skittish when dhole were in the area and tended to call frequently then.

Winter is the time of courtship in our jungles, and the stillness on the river was occasionally shattered by rutting calls of chital stags. We watched a courting pair of Red-wattled lapwings. The pair flew in together and while the female settled on a rock, the male did a noisy, dipping-flight courtship display before joining her.

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Shikra (S. Balajee)

We found occasion to catch a bunch of fascinating jungle anecdotes about Thomraj’s colorful pre-JLR days. About running into a leopard that killed one of the goats he was grazing as a fourteen year old, to plucky-while-mischievous deeds from jungles long ago.

  1. Ashy prinia
  2. Asian brown flycatcher
  3. Asian paradise flycatcher
  4. Barn swallow
  5. Black eagle
  6. Black-hooded oriole
  7. Blue-faced malkoha
  8. Brahminy kite
  9. Brown-capped pigmy woodpecker
  10. Brown fish owl
  11. Brown hawk owl
  12. Brown-headed barbet (calls)
  13. Chestnut-headed bee eater
  14. Cinereous tit
  15. Common francolin
  16. Common hawk cuckoo (calls)
  17. Common iora
  18. Common kingfisher
  19. Common myna
  20. Common skylark
  21. Common tailorbird
  22. Common woodshrike
  23. Coppersmith barbet (calls)
  24. Coucal (calls)
  25. Crested serpent eagle
  26. Darter
  27. Golden-fronted leaf bird
  28. Great cormorant
  29. Green bee eater
  30. Greenish warbler
  31. Grey junglefowl
  32. Golden oriole
  33. Green imperial pigeon
  34. Hoopoe
  35. Indian grey hornbill
  36. Indian robin
  37. Indian scops owl
  38. Indian silverbill
  39. Jungle babbler
  40. Jungle crow
  41. Jungle owlet (calls)
  42. Large cuckooshrike
  43. Lesser fish eagle
  44. Lesser flameback
  45. Little cormorant
  46. Little egret
  47. Magpie robin
  48. Painted spurfowl
  49. Peafowl
  50. Pied kingfisher
  51. Purple-rumped sunbird
  52. Red-rumped swallow
  53. Red-vented bulbul
  54. Red-wattled lapwing
  55. Red-whiskered bulbul
  56. River tern
  57. Rose-ringed parakeet
  58. Scaly-breasted munia
  59. Shikra
  60. Small pratincole
  61. Spotted dove
  62. Stork-billed kingfisher
  63. Unidentified swift
  64. Tawny eagle
  65. Tickell’s blue flycatcher
  66. White-bellied drongo
  67. White-breasted waterhen
  68. White-browed bulbul
  69. White-browed wagtail
  70. White-cheeked barbet (calls)
  71. White-throated kingfisher
  72. Wire-tailed swallow
  73. Yellow-billed babbler
  74. Yellow-footed green pigeon
  75. Yellow-throated sparrow
  1. Chital
  2. Grizzled giant squirrel
  3. Tufted langur
  4. Mugger

Trip report: Galibore/Cauvery WLS, Sep 2014

Trip Report:          Galibore/Cauvery Wildlife Sanctuary

Dates:                   13-14 Sep 2014

Camp:                   JLR’s Galibore Nature Camp

Who:                     Dr. M, Dr. R, SS, VJ and three kids Vh, Vv & P

All photographs used in this post were clicked by Dr. M

A quick weekend trip to the Galibore camp, 100 kms away. The second summer was here, so the weather was warmish.

En route we made crawling progress after Kanakapura, owing to the birding. The doctor couple being sharp spotters necessitated plenty of slow-downs and stops. We saw a solitary Black-shouldered kite, White-headed babbler (Yellow-billed, to the punctilious), Small minivet, Baya weaver bird, Black ibis and Scaly-breasted munia amongst other avifauna. Beyond the new check-post and before the hairpin bends, we ran into flocks of European bee-eaters on the wires. And past Sangam, in the forest, there was a tree laden heavy with Red-rumped swallows.

European bee-eater:

European B eater

In the camp were plenty of White-browed wagtails, foraging on the ground. And an occasional Forest wagtail. In addition we spotted Black-hooded oriole (plentiful, these), Gold-fronted leaf bird, Tawny-bellied babbler, a female Asian paradise flycatcher, White-bellied drongo and Asian brown flycatcher. And the Grizzled giant squirrels of course. These have built nests at this time of year, and Thomraj – our new-found friend and competent birder – explained that the squirrels build multiple nests as decoys to evade Changeable hawk eagles and other predators. My old favorite Govind was there too, and accompanied us on all outings as well.

Grizzled giant squirrel:

Grizzled giant squirrel

Tawny-bellied babbler:

Tawny bellied babbler

The evening coracle ride turned up Wire-tailed swallow, darter, Green imperial pigeon, Common kestrel, Asian paradise flycatcher, Lesser fish eagle, Grey hornbill, Stork-billed kingfisher and a bird we later surmised to be the Yellow bittern. While the ladies and kids jeeped back from the Coracle alighting point five or six kilometers downstream, SS, Dr. R and I walked back to the camp in the gathering darkness. We flushed a flock of sandgrouse in the fading light, most likely Chestnut-bellied. Painted and Black-bellied sandgrouse also occur here although they are rarer. Elephants had been sighted on the road the previous day, but this encounter continues to elude me at Galibore.

Green imperial pigeon:

GIP

Yellow bittern:

Yellow bittern

Additions sighted in the next morning’s walk included Puff-throated babbler, Sirkeer malkoha, Common babbler, Common wood-shrike, Brown-capped pygmy woodpecker, Large wood-shrike and Cinereous tit. And a bird we later identified as the Yellow-crowned pygmy woodpecker. As a completely unnecessary aside, the Cinerous tit turns up occasionally outside the kitchen window in Bangalore too, on an Inga dulcis tree. Along with Purple-rumped sunbird, White-cheeked barbet, Ashy prinia, Tailor bird, Rose-ringed parakeet, Red-whiskered bulbul and Jungle myna. And crows.

Puff-throated babbler:

Puff throated babbler

I had to forego the rafting owing to junior P’s terror of it, but went along with the jeep to drop the others off. On the way back I saw Black eagle, Grey francolin and Jungle bush quail.

Before and at lunch, there was this tall, dark, grey-haired, hatted gentleman sitting around. Suspecting I knew who he was, I asked one of the boys manning the counter and was told that he was a ‘retired forest officer’. But my suspicions proved right and Sundar, the manager and a very amiable gentleman, was kind enough to introduce me to Dr. AJT Johnsingh a short while later. This was a pleasant surprise and a privilege of sorts.

We sat on plastic chairs by the riverside, Dr. Johnsingh, Sundar, Dr. R and I, and chatted. I told Dr. Johnsingh I had thoroughly enjoyed Field days (see my review) and he said an extended version was in the pipeline. He also talked about having traced Corbett’s footsteps in the lower Himalayas (On Jim Corbett’s Trail, Orient Blackswan). And also about how elephants in Africa communicate with each other over great distances, about ancient practices of preserving ragi stocks in vast underground caverns, and about why elephants don’t stay in a confined area even if food and water is plentiful. The badagas in Bandipur evidently believed that the smell of the dung was distasteful to them and compelled them to move on. And considering elephants eat 200 kgs of vegetation a day and defecate over fifteen times, there is a lot of dung lying around. This theory he heard during his dhole research days in 1976. He also strongly recommended Lawrence Anthony’s books to us – The Elephant Whisperer and The Last Rhino.

While we were talking, Dr. Johnsingh suddenly drew our attention to chital on the far bank. Dr. R spotted some brief movement, but I could spot nothing even through the binoculars until the deer were completely in the open. A little demonstration of superior spotting skills and visual acuity by a much older man.

I wanted an autograph, but Dr. Johnsingh politely declined to sign as the only book I had to sign on was Satpada – Our world of insects. He however happily agreed to a photograph, which Dr. R then took.

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On the way back, there is a tamarind tree a short way from the camp, and beside a large boulder. Thomraj had pointed out an Indian scops owl nest’s location on this tree while walking down the previous evening. He said the owls withdrew into the hollow if people approached on foot, but were quite alright with people approaching in cars. He had recommended we check out and photograph the owls the next day on our way back. Accordingly we found an owl peeping out as this species typically does, and both the doctors got some pictures. SS, who was driving the car following could not locate the nest and I sneaked out to show him, only to have the owl disappear. We then decided to turn back to the camp for a quick coffee, to give the bird time to reappear. On the second approach, the owl wasn’t in sight and SS who was now in the lead, moved on. We hung around for a few minutes and the owl made a re-appearance, making for some excellent photographs in mellow evening light.

Indian scops owl:

Scops owl2

I’m referencing a piece I wrote about Galibore many months back in JLRexplore here.

The list

Birds:

  1. Asian brown flycatcher
  2. Asian koel
  3. Asian paradise flycatcher
  4. Ashy prinia (calls)
  5. Baya weaver bird
  6. Bay-backed shrike?
  7. Black drongo
  8. Black eagle
  9. Black-hooded oriole
  10. Black ibis
  11. Black-shouldered kite
  12. Blue-bearded bee eater
  13. Blue-faced malkoha
  14. Brahminy kite
  15. Chestnut-bellied sandgrouse
  16. Cinereous tit
  17. Common babbler
  18. Common kestrel
  19. Common kingfisher
  20. Common woodshrike
  21. Coppersmith barbet
  22. Coucal (calls)
  23. Darter
  24. European bee-eater
  25. Forest wagtail
  26. Gold fronted leaf bird
  27. Greater cormorant?
  28. Green bee-eater
  29. Green imperial pigeon
  30. Grey francolin
  31. Grey heron
  32. Grey junglefowl (calls)
  33. Indian grey hornbill
  34. Indian robin
  35. Indian roller
  36. Indian scops owl
  37. Indian treepie (calls)
  38. Jungle babbler
  39. Jungle bush quail
  40. Jungle owlet (calls)
  41. Large woodshrike
  42. Lark?
  43. Lesser fish eagle
  44. Lesser flameback
  45. Little cormorant
  46. Little brown dove
  47. Magpie robin
  48. Open-billed stork
  49. Oriental white-eye
  50. Pygmy woodpecker (brown-capped)
  51. Plain prinia
  52. Puff-throated babbler
  53. Purple-rumped sunbird
  54. Red-rumped swallow
  55. Scaly-breasted munia
  56. Sirkeer malkoha
  57. Small minivet
  58. Spotted dove
  59. Spotted owlet (Dr. M only)
  60. Stork-billed kingfisher
  61. Tawny-bellied babbler
  62. Unidentified warbler
  63. White-bellied drongo
  64. White-browed wagtail
  65. White-cheeked barbet
  66. White-headed babbler
  67. White-throated kingfisher
  68. Wire-tailed swallow
  69. Yellow bittern
  70. Yellow-crowned pygmy woodpecker

Mammals:

  1. Tufted langur
  2. Chital
  3. Common mongoose
  4. Grizzled giant squirrel

Others:

  1. Monitor lizard
  2. Rock agama